Speed Limits are Set to Increase

Credit: KTRE

Transportation officials are proposing speed-limit increases on several highway stretches, including Interstate 45 south of Interstate 20; Interstate 35E and U.S. 67 south of I-20 among others. In total there are 60 counties in the state of Texas that will see their speed limits increase. This is the largest conversion since the 82nd Legislature passed the legislation and Governor Perry signed House Bill 1353. The bill would allow the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) to increase speed limits on Texas highways to 75 mph, provided that it can be shown that the increase will not compromise overall safety.

According to TxDOT Traffic Operations Director, Carol Rawson, the increase in the speed limits will not be made official until the signs are posted along Texas roadways.

The new 75 mph speed limits that were approved Thursday are located at:

  • I-10—289 miles across El Paso, Gillespie, Kerr, Kendall, Bexar, Guadalupe, Caldwell, Gonzales, Fayette, Colorado, Austin, Jefferson and Orange counties
  • I-20—423 miles across Crane, Ector, Midland, Martin, Howard, Mitchell, Nolan, Taylor, Callahan, Eastland, Erath, Palo Pinto, Van Zandt, Smith, Gregg and Harrison counties
  • I-27—109 miles across Lubbock, Hale, Swisher and Randall counties
  • I-30—139 miles across Hunt, Hopkins, Franklin, Titus, Morris and Bowie counties
  • I-35—106 miles across Webb, Medina, Atascosa, Bexar, Hill and Cooke counties
  • I-37—130 miles across Nueces, San Patricio, Live Oak, Atascosa and Bexar counties
  • I-40—166 miles across Deaf Smith, Oldham, Potter, Carson, Gray, Donley and Wheeler counties
  • I-44—11 miles across Wichita County
  • I-45—143 miles across Walker, Madison, Leon, Freestone and Navarro counties

People are naturally concerned when speed limits increase. This is because with increased speeds comes increased chances of accidents.

It was in the 1970’s under the Nixon Administration, that the national speed limit of 55 miles per hour was established. Then, it was considered a very effective way to conserve the precious petroleum resources that were in too short of supply at the time. The rules were abandoned in 1995 under the Clinton Administration and states, at the risk of losing highway dollars subsidized by the government in some cases, raised their speed limits, especially on Interstate highways such as Interstate 80.

A total of 36 states across the nation have raised their speed limits to 65 miles per hour and higher. The state of Texas on one 40 mile stretch of highway between San Antonio and Austin has raised the speed limit to 85 miles per hour.

Many motorists may think these higher speed limits are a very good thing, while others with more of an eye towards safety and public concerns may cringe at the thought.

When speeds increase, deaths inevitably also increase. In a recent National Highway Safety Administration report, it was indicated that roughly 30 per cent of all highway fatalities in the year 2011 could be directly attributed to excessive rates of speed. When a driver goes faster, they must also increase the amount of stopping distance needed to bring their vehicle to a halt.

If you or a loved one has been in an accident that has been caused by high speeds, give our offices a call. You may be entitled to compensation. When you call our offices, we will match you with one of our lawyers who will take the time to listen to the specifics of your situation and tell you what your accident case may be really worth. Expenses such as medical costs can mount up. We are here for you. Your initial consultation is confidential and without cost or obligation to you.

Transportation officials are proposing speed-limit increases on several highway stretches, including Interstate 45 south of Interstate 20; Interstate 35E and U.S. 67 south of I-20 among others. In total there are 60 counties in the state of Texas that will see their speed limits increase. This is the largest conversion since the 82nd Legislature passed the legislation and Governor Perry signed House Bill 1353. The bill would allow the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) to increase speed limits on Texas highways to 75 mph, provided that it can be shown that the increase will not compromise overall safety.

According to TxDOT Traffic Operations Director, Carol Rawson, the increase in the speed limits will not be made official until the signs are posted along Texas roadways.

The new 75 mph speed limits that were approved Thursday are located at:

  • I-10—289 miles across El Paso, Gillespie, Kerr, Kendall, Bexar, Guadalupe, Caldwell, Gonzales, Fayette, Colorado, Austin, Jefferson and Orange counties
  • I-20—423 miles across Crane, Ector, Midland, Martin, Howard, Mitchell, Nolan, Taylor, Callahan, Eastland, Erath, Palo Pinto, Van Zandt, Smith, Gregg and Harrison counties
  • I-27—109 miles across Lubbock, Hale, Swisher and Randall counties
  • I-30—139 miles across Hunt, Hopkins, Franklin, Titus, Morris and Bowie counties
  • I-35—106 miles across Webb, Medina, Atascosa, Bexar, Hill and Cooke counties
  • I-37—130 miles across Nueces, San Patricio, Live Oak, Atascosa and Bexar counties
  • I-40—166 miles across Deaf Smith, Oldham, Potter, Carson, Gray, Donley and Wheeler counties
  • I-44—11 miles across Wichita County
  • I-45—143 miles across Walker, Madison, Leon, Freestone and Navarro counties

People are naturally concerned when speed limits increase. This is because with increased speeds comes increased chances of accidents.

It was in the 1970’s under the Nixon Administration, that the national speed limit of 55 miles per hour was established. Then, it was considered a very effective way to conserve the precious petroleum resources that were in too short of supply at the time. The rules were abandoned in 1995 under the Clinton Administration and states, at the risk of losing highway dollars subsidized by the government in some cases, raised their speed limits, especially on Interstate highways such as Interstate 80.

A total of 36 states across the nation have raised their speed limits to 65 miles per hour and higher. The state of Texas on one 40 mile stretch of highway between San Antonio and Austin has raised the speed limit to 85 miles per hour.

Many motorists may think these higher speed limits are a very good thing, while others with more of an eye towards safety and public concerns may cringe at the thought.

When speeds increase, deaths inevitably also increase. In a recent National Highway Safety Administration report, it was indicated that roughly 30 per cent of all highway fatalities in the year 2011 could be directly attributed to excessive rates of speed. When a driver goes faster, they must also increase the amount of stopping distance needed to bring their vehicle to a halt.

If you or a loved one has been in an accident that has been caused by high speeds, give our offices a call. You may be entitled to compensation. When you call our offices, we will match you with one of our lawyers who will take the time to listen to the specifics of your situation and tell you what your accident case may be really worth. Expenses such as medical costs can mount up. We are here for you. Your initial consultation is confidential and without cost or obligation to you.

 

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